June 9, 2011

A friend of mine sent me an email today which said:

----

Please read, share and comment on my article (well, it actually only got published in the online blog section) on the Express Tribune website - http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/6294/an-open-letter-to-the-chief-justice-from-a-granddaughter/ - I published under a pseudonym awith a vague bio to avoid arrest and/or being called in under suo moto action.

----

And so I read, I cried, I thought, I hurt and I shared this with as many people as I could - through emails, though the blog, through facebook. I hope you will read it, and while you do, I hope you will think about all the people in this country who you know - and who I know - who have long since lost hope for justice.

People like me who have seen their loved ones senselessly killed by perpetrators who will never be found. People who woke up one day to find parents, siblings, cousins, friends missing never to be seen again. Unless they're lucky and a dead body appears to quiet the hope and begin the inevitable mourning process. People who - like K - who are forced to watch while those who have wronged them are allowed to escape the net of 'justice' unpunished.

I stand with K. And I demand justice for her, and her family. I hope you do too.

2 comments:

Nida said...

That letter was extremely moving. I'm so sorry for her loss and for yours too. It can't be easy to know that the death of someone you love wasn't an act of nature but the cruelty of man--and that our corrupt system has let said man slip through the cracks. I don't know whether chief justice will stick to his promise, but I sincerely do hope that the families of the victims of senseless attacks find peace somehow, somewhere, someday.

Anonymous said...

The fact that you comment on such things, makes it easier to know that propagation of justice is not a lost cause. Thank you. even though, you're not ahmadi, you're still speaking against the atrocities in our society. You are amongst the few who can speak up against the ills going on with minorities.

Its like that saying :
First They came… – Pastor Martin Niemoller
First they came for the communists,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a communist.

Then they came for the trade unionists,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Jew.

Then they came for me
and there was no one left to speak out for me.

On the pattern of the Pastors words true to our subcontinent:

First they came for the Ahmadis,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t an Ahmadi.

Then they came for the Christians,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Christian.

Then they came for the Shia,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Shia.

Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak out for me.